Monday, August 10, 2009

In Ulm, um Ulm, und um Ulm Herum

Ulm Rathaus and Ulmer Münster

The title of this post is a well known tongue twister about Ulm, Germany, a very charming city in Baden-Württemberg that I had the pleasure of visiting two weekends ago (Streetparade write-up tomorrow!). Last year, around this time, Ingo - Jace's colleague - invited us to witness the Memmingen Fischertag, and this year we were invited back to visit his family and we were treated to a visit to the picturesque Ulm, about 30 minutes away from Memmingen by train.

Ulm Art Museum

The city was almost completely distroyed in the war, so it is now a mix of old and new, and a fine mix if I do say so myself. The modern and the old do not clash but rather somehow compliment themselves in this modernesque city. 



The highlight of the city is definately the Ulm Münster, and it is the tallest church in the world! The steeple is 161.53 meters (or 530 feet) high, and it is 768 steps to the top... I know this not only because I read the sign on the door (below), but because I also ran up to the top... ok, so I walked... ok, fine... fine... so I might have crawled, but I did it!



After climbing up all the spiraling steps, all 768 of them, you are rewarded with quite a view of Ulm, Neu Ulm and the surrounding area. (I cannot help myself when places are named 'New' something... I would have loved to have been at that city meeting...'Order, order... we need to name this new place... the one next to Ulm...' Small guy in the back says, 'How about 'New Ulm.'... all heads nod in agreement. 'Brilliant! That is the best name ever. Genius. Give him the keys to the city. Meeting adjourned.'



The Gothic cathedral/church is really quite amazing up close (check out those gargoyles!) and from afar. I recommend a visit even if you do not go up the spire... but if you do...



you are naturally rewarded with views like this:


Ulm from the Münster

... and views of the market below -great Saturday market!



After all that climbing, some of us were in serious need of a sausage... those that climbed that is (no names will be mentioned... ahem... ahem...)... the rest, well they had one too - cheaters. :) This was an excellent bratwurst - ask Jace if he agrees... Jace, good Bratwurst?



Oh he is too busy eating... Ingo, good bratwust?



Oh he is busy, too it seems... hmm.. moving on. :)



We then headed down to the Danube and walked along the city walls, taking in the view and the quaint houses along the river before making our way to the Fischerviertel, the fishermen's quarter.



The Fischerviertel is situated along the Blau River, and is so picturesque that it makes me well up inside.The area is full of cobblestone streets, foot bridges, wooden/timbered houses, and everything so wonderfully and stereotypically German.


Fischerviertal, Ulm

This below is the schiefes Haus or crooked house right on the Blau and it is really a wonder of architecture. You can see it above in the distance, how it jets out above the water!

Even if you don't have great friends that take you to awesome places in Bavaria and across the Danube into Ulm, I would highly recommend a visit. Ulm is great for a day trip - try the local beer, too, it is tasty, and perhaps then head on over to Münich afterwards - it would make for a lovely weekend.



By the way, the tongue twister title of this post means: In Ulm, around Ulm and about in Ulm :)
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3 comments:

zurich said...

I agree 100%. Ulm is worth a visit. Some years back I had to drive from Stuttgert to Munich and made a point to stop over for a rest. Still have such fond memories :-)

Sean said...

Nice post... sorry about the steps... been there done that and, well, crawl would be optimistic in my case!

MP said...

What a cute little town! I've been lurking and had to comment today because you're photo of the market below actually made my palms sweat...I don't think I'll be hanging off of any minster spires soon! (Even if the gargoyles are quite cute.) Great post!

 

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